Posts Tagged ‘primer’

DIY: Footboard turned Message Center

Monday, June 8th, 2009

For me, 50% off day at the St. Vincent de Paul is the definition of excitement.  Not only do I love the treasure hunt, not only do I get giddy at the thought of a big discount, but I relish the opportunity to transform found objects in a way not contemplated by others. I found a little lost footboard, sitting in the dust, behind all of the other large furniture, scratched, neglected and alone. This poor little end of a bed had no mate.  From the cobwebs surrounding it, I could tell no one had glanced at it in awhile.  It was $25, but then 50% off, so I brought it home for $12.50 for a complete makeover.

Please say hello to the new and improved version of my footboard.  This little lady can multitask.  Not only is she able to sit outside and be charming as a chalkboard, she is also a unique home message board and organizer, complete with chalkboard center, and ceramic knobs for hanging sweaters, umbrellas, and hats.

Before and After, outdoor style:

Before and After, indoor style:

 

How to Transform a Footboard into a Message Center:

Supplies:

 

  1. Footboard
  2. Medium grade sandpaper
  3. Primer
  4. Paint color of choice
  5. Chalkboard paint
  6. Knobs of choice
  7. D Ring Hangers
  8. Screwdriver

Step One:  Sand your footboard to remove all traces of varnish.  Prime your piece with spray or brush on primer.  With these smaller projects, I prefer spray primer for faster application and drying time.  Apply two coats and allow to dry.

Step Two:  Cover your footboard with your paint color of choice, whether by brush or spray.  Again, I chose to cover with spray in a favorite color: Rustoleum’s Heirloom White.  Apply two coats and allow to dry.

One nice thing about this particular kind of spray paint: it is for outdoor use as well.  So when you paint with this product, you may use your transformed footboard outside !  (See photos below.)

Step Three:  When your paint is dry, tape it off so to allow for application of chalkboard paint.  There I go again with the spray version for faster application and drying time.  Apply two coats and allow to dry.

Tip:  This particular brand of chalkboard spray I chose was very sensitive to whether there was a good coat of primer underneath.  In one corner, it started to peel up since the primer there was too thinly applied. I had to go back in just that corner, sand it again, prime it again, then apply the chalkboard paint again.

You can use this project to add an interesting element to your outdoor decor.

I like how this particular footboard already had curved pencil trim that made the placement of chalkboard paint easy.  If you find a plain footboard, you can easily add your own trim with molding and a miter box. If your intention is to use your piece indoors as a place for hanging hats or handbags, then follow these additional steps.

Step Four:  Drill pilot holes with a drill bit.  Attach knobs to the bottom of your footboard.

I chose to use two kinds of cream colored ceramic knobs to complement the paint color:

Step Five:  Locate your wall studs, and line up your footboard with the studs.  Mark the location of the studs on your footboard.   Attach D ring hangers to the rear of your footboard, then hang on your wall.

This recycled footboard now hangs in the hallway as a place for handbags, umbrellas, sweaters and winter hats, for our family’s use and for guests as well.  I like that I chalkboard center allows me to change the wording depending on the occasion, or the season.

 

Here’s just another way to change up an ordinary piece of furniture, and revamp it in a unique way.

 

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DIY: Painted Thrift Store Cabinet

Friday, May 22nd, 2009

I’m up to my old tricks again, picking up bargain furniture for cheap at the Goodwill thrift store, and transforming into something better for my home.

Some of you might actually like the “Before” and I have to tell you, I did too, but it was terribly scratched up at the base and on top, and for fifteen dollars, I felt no guilt in painting it.  The finish was also a speckled stain you see on a lot of old furniture, and up close it looked very old fashioned.  So I decided to paint it white for my daughter’s room because it was the perfect size for a narrow wall. 

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DIY: Painted Thrift Store Desk

Monday, May 18th, 2009

Y’all know I often circle the local thrift stores in the hopes of finding new treasures.  Last week, I found a solid wood desk with a few scratches and dings, but overall in really good condition.  I mixed up a batch of color with some leftover paint samples, and transformed this old fashioned desk into a lovely green gem perfect for my little girl’s room.

Here’s the Before and After:

 

I had been looking for a desk for my daughter’s room, and got really lucky when I saw the $16.00 price tag on this desk at the local St. Vincent de Paul.  Yes I know.  Sixteen dollars.

 

But get this.  I asked the manager for a discount, and he gave me 40% off, so I only paid $9.60 for this solid wood desk.  Total score !

It would have been easy to sand it down and stain it like I did with this dresser, but with those feminine base legs and that French style hardware, I just had to place it in my daughter’s room, and that meant I had to paint it.

I was inspired by these bright pieces I saw at the local Antique Fair a few weeks ago, selling for hundreds of dollars.

 

I decided, rather than painting the desk a cream color like all of the other furniture in her room, that I would mix it up !  Be bold ! Paint it green !  But what color green ?

I had some leftover color from her wall paint, added some apple green paint from my stash, and I mixed in some gray too for a custom color.

Painting Older Wood Furniture:

Supplies:

  1. Medium grade sandpaper
  2. Primer
  3. Paint color of choice
  4. Roller brush and holder
  5. Polycrylic protectant

Step One:  Remove hardware. Sand your surface to remove any varnish or debris in preparation of primer.

Step Two:  Prime your piece with a good primer.  I prefer the spray variety since it saves a lot of time, but you can also use a brush on like Zinsser’s oil based in the brown can.   Allow to dry for recommended time.  I highly recommend these snap on spray paint guns, they save time and finger cramps, plus assist with even application.

 

Step Three:  Roll on the paint with a roller and follow up with a paintbrush to smooth any uneven spots and fill in any hard to reach nooks.  Apply two coats and allow to dry for 24 hours.

A few helpful tips on paint application:

  1. Use a new roller brush (not the rolling tool, the roller brush itself).  I tried to be “green” and reuse an old roller leftover from a previous project, but it had tiny fibers and dust on it, which ended up in my paint, and I had to hand pick it all out, wasting about thirty minutes and causing intense frustration.  Aaarrrggghh.  Spend the extra $2 for the new roller – trust me.
  2. Paint in an area where there is no chance of a breeze.  In my case, it was my garage with the garage door closed and the screened window open.  I have tried to paint outside several times, but the gnats and dust always ends up in my paint, and I really wasn’t looking for that extra “texture”.

Here I am painting in my garage last Thursday late at night in frustration because my personal favorite was kicked off American Idol.  I was working off my anger.   (My poor Danny. Sniff, sigh.)

Step Four (optional):  If you seek a distressed or antiqued look, go over the edges of your painted surface lightly with sandpaper to expose the wood underneath.

 

Step Five:  Apply a protectant like Minwax Polycrylic to your piece to protect your marvelous paint job.  I like to use Minwax products for a good reason.  If you’ve distressed your edges with sandpaper, the poly also helps to enhance the wood tone underneath.  Allow your poly to dry for at least 24 hours.

This French style hardware antiqued and beautiful so I didn’t paint or polish it.

I lined the drawers with some pretty paper too.

 

Final Result

Here’s the desk in her room:

What do you all think of the new desk?  Are you about to paint a piece of furniture and completely transform it?   Do tell.

 

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