Posts Tagged ‘no sew’

DIY: Fabric Covered Mousepad

Tuesday, August 4th, 2009

Plain mousepads are boring!  There are plenty of pretty pads available out there for purchase, but I wanted to recycle my old one with the use of some fabric.  This is such a simple project !  I had a plain gray mousepad that I used to use in my old office, but with all of these new upgrades, the mouse pad could not be ignored.  So I recycled my old mousepad by adding a scrap of fabric I had leftover from a recent project.

Supplies:

  1. Any rubber backed mousepad
  2. Fusible web for bonding (called Stitch Witchery)
  3. Iron, ironing board, and moist washcloth
  4. Fabric of choice (avoid fabrics that are too sheer, have embroidery, or that resist fusible web due to their artificial fibers).

First, align your fabric pattern on your upside down mousepad, then trim about an inch of fabric all around.

Next, trim a piece of fusible web to the size of your mouse pad, and fold your fabric over the webbing.  Use your hot iron and a moist washcloth to bond the fabric to the pad.  Be careful not to melt your rubber backside by avoiding any direct contact between the back and your iron.

   

Once you’ve done all four sides, then trim the fabric on your corners, pinch the fabric down, and use more fusible web to bond the corners to the mouse pad.

 

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That’s all folks.  Simple, and a project you can accomplish in about 15 minutes.

For another tutorial on how to sew a mouse pad, see this post at Craft A Week.

Or try Ashley’s Modge Podge version at Make It And Love It.

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DIY: No Sew Swag Valance

Tuesday, July 28th, 2009

I am in the middle of a remodel of my home office.  I originally envisioned elegant window panels scaling the wall from floor to ceiling.  But then I realized that if I am surrounding my window with cabinetry and shelving, then the idea of dramatic curtain panels had to go, well, out the window.  But I still needed a touch of fabric to cover the less than lovely white blinds.

I’ve made window valances before so I constructed yet another valance for my home office with the same technique I’ve used before, but this time, I added a soft swag.  I found this curtain on clearance at Lowes for $7.

How to Make a No Sew Swag Window Valance:

A note on fabric choice:  Since you’ll be using a lined curtain turned on its side to construct your valance, choose a solid, or a pattern that looks good when you flip the pattern horizontal instead of vertical.

Supplies:

  1. Curtain panel long enough to run width (not length) of window
  2. Staple gun
  3. Fusible web for bonding fabric (sold as Stitch Witchery or Heat-n-Bond at fabric stores)
  4. 1/2 inch x 2 inch thick pine, birch or poplar board from home improvement store, cut to length of valance
  5. 1.5 inch “L” Brackets
  6. Iron

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Step One:  Choose where you want your valance to sit above your window, then measure the length of fabric you’ll need to cover the top of the board, and hang down over your window.  Cut fabric to chosen length.

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Step Two:  Trim side of curtain panel to width of valance, plus 2 extra inches on sides.  Use the fusible web, a hot iron, and a moist cloth to bond your fabric together to form a clean hem.

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Step Three:  Press your fabric with an iron to remove any wrinkles, then staple it to the top of your wood board, leaving 2 inches overlap on each side.  Trim off any excess fabric on the top.

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Step Four:  Wrap your fabric around the side of your board and secure side with a small staple.

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Step Five:  Locate studs on wall, then position your “L” brackets on your valance to match up to the wall studs.  Screw valance into wall.

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Step Six:  To swag your valance, pinch your fabric together, then secure with a safety pin.  If you experience too much “droop” in the middle of your valance, and it pulls away from the window’s edge, one trick is to secure your fabric to the wall underneath the fold with a small tack.  It works !

 

Step back and enjoy your inexpensive and homemade swag valance.

Now I just need to install those gigantic cabinets!

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