Posts Tagged ‘my home’

Rugs in the Casa

Friday, August 31st, 2012

I’ve had a lot of questions lately about the rugs in our house so today I thought I’d share a little more about them and some of my favorite sources for rugs.   We have hardwood floors downstairs so I have rugs in all of the spaces, and a couple upstairs on the carpets too, just to add color and pattern.   I don’t want to spend a fortune on a rug because I don’t want to freak if something spills on it like wine or chocolate or kid crud, so I’m always looking for affordable options.  Maybe someday I’ll have a Madeline Weinrib or a Thomas Paul, but for now, I try to keep rug purchases under $400, preferably less. 

Area rugs always ground a space so I like to use them to set the style or palette for the room or sitting area.  I prefer when the style of the rug coordinates with the style of the room, so that’s where I begin when searching for a rug but you’re always free to mix it up!  For the living room, I went with a traditional style, it’s a rug I bought on clearance at World Market two years ago, it used to sit in the family room but it has now made itself at home in the living room.  

winter living room cg

I get a ton of emails about this rug, but unfortunately I can’t find it anywhere, even on eBay, but here are some comparables!

comparable rugs

Caspian Blue + Coliseum + Blue Medallion

 

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Grafting Pinot Noir

Thursday, June 14th, 2012

A fascinating thing happened in our backyard last week – at least for us.  Matt and I have a hobby vineyard on our back hill that we’ve mentioned before – those 100 vines can produce up to 25 cases of wine.  We’ve experienced two unfortunate harvest years in a row so we decided to make a change to the varietal of wine that we grow.  Here’s why.

The sugar content of grapes determine their ripeness and it is the key component that influences the future wine.  Weather is the primary factor in growing grapes, we always hope for wet winters, hot summer days with cool evenings, and a dry fall before the grapes are harvested.  For the last two years, we’ve been unable to get the Petite Syrah’s sugar levels high enough to make wine because the varietal doesn’t ripen until late October.  We’ve also been savaged by critters who raid the fruit in October as a source of food, recalled by Matt’s woeful harvest story of 2010.

After consulting with local experts and winemakers, we came to the conclusion we’d be better off if those 100 vines were Pinot Noir grapes (most commonly grown in our terroir) and not the Petite Syrah we planted twelve years ago because they ripen an entire month earlier, and are also the most commonly grown grape within 25 miles.

So what’s a winemaker to do to solve this agricultural dilemma?  It’s a process called grafting, and it’s an old technique that allows us to change the variety of the grapes without the expense of replanting, and a loss of only one year’s crop.  Grafting only costs $1 per plant (plus labor) and at such an affordable rate, it was worth the process.  It takes someone with knowledge to do it, so we hired Miguel with his 12 years of grafting experience who came highly recommended.

The first step was hard to take, he cut down all our green grapevine leaves within an hour leaving big piles of beautiful branches down the rows and across the yard, and then cut the trunks down to 3’ tall, leaving the scene feeling rather naked, for lack of a better word.

trim all vines

 

The next step was the actual grafting process which requires what’s called “scion” wood, that comes from the mother Pinot Noir canes that are collected for this purpose the season before.  We’ve been planning this transformation since our disappointing lack of a harvest last fall, so we planned ahead with a winemaker we consult with every year during the crush, and secured some healthy Pinot Noir stems which were kept in cold storage for many months in anticipation of grafting.

Scion canes are dormant branches that are kept in cold refrigeration after they’re cut in winter.  Each piece of scion wood provides several buds for grafting, here’s a look at one used by Miguel – he looks for the buds that will successfully become new branches.

pinot noir scion cane

 

All canes are kept moist in a carpenter’s box as the grafter moves from vine to vine grafting the new variety.

keep vines moist in carpenter box

 

Here is how this is done up close.  First he trims back the bark in the section where the vine will be grafted.

strip bark

 

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