Inspiration

Blu Homes Tour in Sonoma

Monday, August 17th, 2015

I’m a kid in a candy store when I get the chance to explore a model home. On Saturday, Blu Homes, the widely popular manufacturer of modern prefabricated homes, was offering a peek into two models they built for a client in Sonoma, and I had the chance to visit and photograph them.

pool and backyard

Blu Homes began as in innovative approach to modern design with the idea to build homes in half the time of traditional method. All Blu homes are smart featuring advanced technology, they’re energy efficient, and built with eco friendly materials.

The models have been installed in over 30 states, but demand is so high right now that Blu Homes is limiting their production to California only for the next 18 months.

I visited two homes on a shared lot, I learned this pair of homes belongs to a client who allowed the tour for a day. I imagine this is a second home since the closets were empty or perhaps the owners haven’t quite moved in yet. The decor was simple throughout.

blu home master bedroom

 

guest room sliding doors

I’m always interested in materials, thankfully Blu Homes provided them! The gorgeous flooring throughout is Plyboo prefinished bamboo in Havana.

There were two full bathrooms in the large Balance model, and one in the smaller Element model, all three showers had brick pattern Emser Lucente glass tile, this first bathroom has the Crystalline in the shower installed in a simple brick pattern, the vanity is Heartwood maple and the floor tile is Emser porcelain tile in Pietre Del Norde Vermont.

blue glass tile shower maple vanity

 

This bathroom again has Emser glass tile in Ocean Mist with white grout, the cabinet is by Heartwood in White Gloss, the countertop is Caesarstone in Quartz Pebble.

blue glass tile shower

This bathroom also had the same gloss cabinet and Caesarstone countertop, the glass tile in the shower again Emser in a bold Empire Gold.

emser glass tile caesarstone countertop

 

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Textile Spotlight: Shibori

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015

It’s been some time since I spotlighted a specific textile. Blue versions are always on my mind especially ones with random imperfections in their patterns so today’s focus is Japanese Shibori. I’m on a lifelong quest to acquire unique textiles, especially ones with a history to them. Shibori fabrics have been popular in fashion and home design for a while now, and with deep blues remaining a popular hue again this summer, it’s no wonder these dyed indigo textiles are in high demand.

shibori pilows on sofa

shibori.com

The technique dates back centuries, shibori is defined by Shibori.org as follows:

“It comes from the Japanese verb root shiboru, ‘to wring, squeeze, press.’ The closest translation would be ‘shaped-resist dyeing.’ The shaping process reserves areas that are recorded as patterns with characteristically soft edges and crinkled textures when cloth is dyed. Rather than treating cloth as a two-dimensional flat surface, shibori techniques give it a three-dimensional form by folding, crumpling, stitching, plaiting, or plucking and twisting… a cloth may be dyed repeatedly using a different shaping method each time.”

shibori rug indogo dye curtains

  jande jonge via bloesem

There are many different types of shibori techniques, differentiated by the materials and steps used to create a particular pattern. One style we’ve embraced in the US is Kanoko known as tie dye where cloth is bound by threads or bands, other shibori techniques have very specific definitions.

shibori dye technique

Arashi requires pole wrapping, Kumo is pleated and bound, Nui is stitched, the list goes on and the pattern possibilities are endless. Years ago I assumed tie dye came from the 1960s and was something we all did to our T-shirts at summer camp, but that craft does have its roots in Japanese shibori. 

indigo dye bedding

urban outfitters

shibori wallpaper

shibori.com 

Randomness and imperfection occur with this resist dyeing process, beautiful patterns emerge from folding, twisting, and binding cloth then submerging it in indigo dye. Many artisans have taken it to a level of near perfection.

japanese shibori

via

I haven’t tried any shibori techniques yet which is so wrong since it combines two of my favorite things: fabric and deep blue. I need to get together a group of friends and host a party, “Shibori and Chardonnay” – sounds like fun to me!

Here are a few DIY projects to inspire:

shibori diy textiles

diy at honestly wtf

indigo dye tea towels

diy at francois et moi

shibori silk scarf

shibori silk scarf

 shibori napkins

shibori napkins

 

More Textile Spotlights:

kilim

velvet

tartan

Kilim

Velvet

Tartan