Garden

Spring Porch + Curly Willow Wreath

Monday, March 26th, 2012

Hey everyone, thanks for all the thoughtful comments on the purpose filled home post, I’ve read every one, I really appreciate your fantastic insight!  I finally got that patch of sun I was waiting for all weekend long, so I was able to get my hands dirty with some new plantings for the front porch. 

I replaced the dying Italian cypress with these pretty blue Potato Bush topiary trees and some ‘Glamorama’ pansies.  Out of storage came the outdoor medallion pillows I’ve had for two summer seasons (found at a local garden department).  The striped ones are these Esther pillows found on sale at Joss & Main.

potato plant tree in urn

blue potato bush

glamorama pansies

 

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Framed Ferns + Garden Link Party

Monday, July 25th, 2011

Hello everyone, happy Monday, and I hope you’re all finding ways to stay cool in the sweltering July heat!  Today is the last of the Fair Weather Forum summer link parties, and the topic is ‘Gardening’.  I had big plans to build a planter and feature it today, but life got in the way, funny how that happens!  Maybe later, maybe next year, who knows!

Instead, I opted for a simple art project with a few stems from the one single fern growing in my yard.  My backyard gets mostly afternoon and evening sun, which is great for grapes but not so good for shade loving plants.  However, I do have one small fern plant tucked underneath our deck, and it thrives there year after year. 

I’m fixing up our guest space since we’re expecting a lot of visitors this upcoming tasting season, and I love bringing the outdoors inside.  I was looking for an inexpensive way to create some simple and unique wall art, so I decided to flatten and preserve some of those fern fronds from our garden, and frame them behind glass.

cg fern wall art

 

framed ferns

 

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Secrets of a Successful Terrarium

Thursday, June 23rd, 2011

One of the nice things about contributors is how much they teach and inspire me.  This month, Courtney is back and he is talking about his personal experience with a project I’ve long wanted to try: a terrarium! 

Placing anything organic under glass is a hot trend right now.  We’re seeing these mini ecosystems pop up everywhere in design, and more and more terrarium vessels available at stylish retailers.  They were big in the 1970’s and now they’re back!

james modern bespoke terrariumI learned with a little research yesterday that the art of a successful terrarium is not a new discovery by any means.

The history of the terrarium dates back to the 19th Century, and grew in popularity in the Victorian Era in England.  Their origination is credited to surgeon and gardening enthusiast Dr. Nathanial Ward. 

An amateur botanist, Ward was conducting an experiment on protecting plants from the polluted London air, and observed how certain plants could thrive and be kept healthy under glass. 

An added bonus to his 1827 discovery was that horticulturists could use glass vessels to protect tropical plant species in ‘Wardian cases’ from sea air on long voyages returning by ship to their homeland. 

I am fascinated by these ‘Wardian cases’ which we now call terrariums, and so is Courtney.  He recently attempted to create one himself, and learned a few things in the process.  

Please welcome back Courtney Lake on the topic of successful terrariums!

“Terrariums are the flora equivalent of a ship in a bottle in my opinion. They are beautiful living sculptures that can serve a multitude of purposes from table centerpiece to anchoring a mantel vignette. The terrariums of today are not the ones we crafted for school science fairs.  Modern terrariums combine form, texture and color to create living works of art.

Yet for many, including myself, creating a successful environment can be intimidating.  Every time I see one, I think to myself “How did they do that?”  It amazes me that people have mastered the art of how to create what are essentially miniature gardens within the confines of a glass vessel.

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