Archive for June, 2011

Peach Galette

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

I’ve been in a mood lately.  A mood to take it easy.  To relax.  To enjoy life’s simpler pleasures.  To me, that includes baked goods.  You too?  

A recent trip to the market reminded me it was peach season, so I brought a dozen home, and contemplated what I could create with them.  I’m often caught up in the idea of trying something new, hence the recent quest for the perfect pie crust.  The attraction to baked goodies continues, pulling me yet again to attempt something both simple and gastronomically wonderful in the kitchen made with ripe fruit and dough.

Enter, the peach galette.

peach galette cg

What the heck is a galette you might ask?  For those who don’t know, a galette is just a fancy French label for a rustic fruit tart.  The kind of tart filled with seasonal fruit and formed with a less than perfectly shaped crust, folded over by hand and baked in the oven.  Less than perfect?  That I can handle. 

Ever since I made my summer list, I’m obsessed with baking with summer fruit, whatever is in season and of the moment.   In May, it was rhubarb crumble, June brought mini cherry pies.  Lately, I’m craving peaches which are in season and readily available everywhere. 

How to make a peach galette?  It’s not difficult. 

First grab yourself a bowl of these. 

bowl of peaches

via

.

Read the rest of this entry »

Google BookmarksBookmark/FavoritesStumbleUponShare

Basic Whitewashing Technique

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

Y’all were too kind with the comments on the cabana reveal last week, thanks so much.  I finally updated last week’s post with sources as promised and by the way, forgot to announce the winner of the Home Depot gift card giveaway from eons ago.  My bad. Congrats to #202 Emily Schloerb, I sent you an email Emily! 

Now for that whitewashed trunk coffee table.  Whitewashing is one of my favorite finishes for wood, some call it faux, I call it fab.  Whitewashing allows anyone to use white paint to brighten a rustic wood piece, yet still allows for much of the wood grain to show through.  In fact, the technique accentuates the details of the wood, which is a win-win in my book. 

In my mind, the white + wood combo makes for a perfect world and I love how you can have both with this finish.  It works well indoors and out, and adds a cottage or coastal vibe. Whitewashing is great for those with kids and pets or in heavy traffic areas (think floors!) because you never need worry about wear and tear, it adds to the appeal.

This was one of the quickest and easiest revamps ever, the whole thing took about 30 minutes.  I started with an old trunk scored for $15 buckaroos at a thrift store. 

whitewashed trunk table before after cg

 

Read the rest of this entry »

Google BookmarksBookmark/FavoritesStumbleUponShare

Guest Post: Painted Checkered Ceiling

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

G’day all, I’m finally back from my trip!  We spent six days traveling up and down the California coast, visiting friends and family along the way, making stops in several quaint and coastal towns.  We enjoyed plenty of sun, sand, and I even made good on a trip to Legoland that I promised my kids for their birthdays months ago.  It’s good to be back, but I’ve a lot of catching up to do!  I’ll be taking the day to do just that, meanwhile, I’d like to introduce one final special guest.

Today, Stacy of Not JUST A Housewife is here.  I’ve been enjoying Stacy’s blog since I discovered her a few months ago.  Stacy is mom of four boys who loves to cook, create, and decorate.  She’s a gal who knows how to work a miter saw (check out her scrap wood lamp) and she’s a huge fan of spray paint too (holla!).  I have long loved checkered floors, but Stacy puts a new twist on the idea by turning her attention upwards.   Please welcome Stacy and her step by step on how to paint a checkered ceiling! 

“Hi, I’m Stacy and I am so excited to be guest posting here today! 

I’d like to share with you my painted checkered pattern on my ceiling in my dining room and my kitchen.

The first thing you need to do is measure your ceiling. Once you have your measurements you can sit down and figure out how big each square needs to be. Uggg.  This was the least fun part of the whole process but probably the most important. Measure, measure, measure!

Then get a laser level that will stick to your ceiling. Mine uses adhesive strips. This whole projects is easier if you have a helper so grab a willing assistant too :) After you make marks along the perimeter, then use the laser level to line up the marks on either end. My husband and I use a long piece of molding as our straight edge to trace the laser line across the ceiling. Once you trace all the lines going one direction, then trace them going the opposite way to create your squares. I guess it depends on the size of your ceiling but this really didn’t take as much time as it sounds like it would.

I marked every other square with an X to show which ones would be painted the darker green.

Read the rest of this entry »

Google BookmarksBookmark/FavoritesStumbleUponShare